ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 636-643

Comparison between cryobiopsy and forceps biopsy in detection of epidermal growth factor receptor amplification in non-small-cell lung cancer


1 Departments of Chest, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt
2 Departments of Clinical Pathology, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt
3 Departments of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
MD Ragia S Sharshar
Chest Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, 1221
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ejb.ejb_40_19

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Background Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents 85% of lung cancer cases. Genotyping is now considered as a cornerstone in proper management and better results of such cancers, especially with targeted therapy. Cryobiopsy is a promising tool in NSCLC to obtain larger samples, with well-preserved tissue sufficient for accurate histopathological and gene detection. Aim To compare cryobiopsy and ordinary forceps results in detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification in NSCLC. Materials and methods Samples from 34 patients with proven NSCLC by cryobiopsy versus forceps biopsy were compared for size, quality, and diagnostic yield of EGFR gene amplification. Results The samples obtained by cryoprobe had larger size and better artifact-free areas with more diagnostic yield of EGFR gene amplification (29.4%) versus with forceps biopsy (8.8%), with gene amplification showing higher statistical significance in younger patients, never smokers, and women (P<0.001). Conclusion Cryobiopsy is an excellent tool for larger, better-quality sampling and for higher diagnostic yield of EGFR amplification in NSCLC.


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