Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 276

Pulmonary function tests in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and the effect of surgery


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Submission06-Aug-2017
Date of Acceptance06-Nov-2018
Date of Web Publication23-May-2018

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood D Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, PO Box 55302, Baghdad, 1111
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ejb.ejb_69_17

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Pulmonary function tests in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and the effect of surgery. Egypt J Bronchol 2018;12:276

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Pulmonary function tests in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and the effect of surgery. Egypt J Bronchol [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Oct 23];12:276. Available from: http://www.ejbronchology.eg.net/text.asp?2018/12/2/276/233044

I have read with interest the study by Yousof et al. [1] on the pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and the effect of surgery. Based on spirometry, the authors found that there were significantly lower values of mean forced vital capacity (FVC), FVC%, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), and FEV1% in the group of patients with CRS compared with the control healthy group. In the group of patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery for CRS, the mean values of FVC, FVC%, FEV1, and FEV1% were significantly higher during the postoperative follow-up period than preoperative PFTs [1]. I presume that these findings ought to be interpreted cautiously owing to the presence of the following important methodological limitation. It is noteworthy that the evaluation of PFTs is usually done by examining the absolute values of FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC, comparing them with predicted values, and examining the shape of the curves. Accurate interpretation of PFTs in particular patients compared with the matched controls requires population-specific reference values (RVs). There are many population-specific RVs of PFTs employed in clinical settings [2],[3]. The authors did not mention which RVs they employed in their study. To the best of my knowledge, the only available Egyptian RVs based on age and height were constructed more than two decades ago for FVC, FEV1, and forced expiratory flow 25–75% for healthy nonsmokers female industrial workers [4], and they are no more valid in the clinical field. As normal lung function tends to be genetically, physiologically, nutritionally, environmentally, psychologically, socioeconomically, and ethnically determined [5], it is of utmost importance to construct new Egyptian population-specific prediction equations to establish RVs of PFTs through consideration of the already mentioned determinants. I presume that the employment of national RVs might alter the study results by Yousof and colleagues.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Yousof AM, Awada OG, Abdel Fattah MT, Ahmada SF. Pulmonary function tests in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and the effect of surgery. Egypt J Bronchol 2017; 11:283–287.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Coates AL, Wong SL, Tremblay C, Hankinson JL. Reference equations for spirometry in the Canadian population. Ann Am Thorac Soc 2016; 13:833–841.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Fawibe AE, Odeigah LO, Saka MJ. Reference equations for spirometric indices from a sample of the general adult population in Nigeria. BMC Pulm Med 2017; 17:48.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Faris R, Elgewaily M, Gadallah M, Abbas H, Elkholi F. Spirometric standards for healthy nonsmokers female industrial workers in Egypt. J Egypt Public Health Assoc 1990; 65:37–47.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Ruppel GL, Enright PL. Pulmonary function testing. Respir Care 2012; 57:165–175.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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