ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 155-161

Mortality predictors in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia requiring ICU admission


1 Department of Chest Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minya, Egypt
2 Department of Anesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minya, Egypt
3 Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minya, Egypt
4 Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minya, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ali O Abdel Aziz
Department of Chest, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minya
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1687-8426.184373

Rights and Permissions

Background: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of mortality. This prospective study was conducted to describe patient’s characteristics, mortality rate, and etiological pathogens in patients with severe CAP who required ICU admission and to determine the predictors of mortality. Patients and methods: This was a multicenter prospective observational study of 57 consecutive patients who were admitted to the ICU with diagnosis of severe CAP from October 2012 to August 2015. Results: Overall 57 patients were included in the study and the overall ICU mortality rate was 49.1%. Heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most common comorbidities associated with severe CAP. Comparison between survivors and nonsurvivors revealed that mortality was associated with old age (P=0.01), low diastolic blood pressure (P=0.04), low PaO2/FiO2 (P=0.04), high acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score (P=0.001), (CURB-65) score (P=0.005), low hemoglobin (P=0.008), and high urea (P=0.04). The univariate analysis demonstrated that the following were the predictors of mortality: age older than 65 years (P=0.03); APACHE II score greater than 20 (P=0.007); CURB-65 of 3 or greater (0.03); total leukocyte count less than 4 or greater than 11×109/(P=0.04); PaO2/FiO2 less than 250 (P=0.03); serum urea greater than 30 mg/dl (P=0.04); presence of septic shock (P=0.003); mechanical ventilation requirement (P=0.02); and bilateral or multilobar infiltrate on chest radiograph (P=0.03). Multiple regression analysis identified high APACHE II score (>20) and septic shock as significant independent predictors of mortality in severe CAP. Microbiological identification was obtained in 52.6% of cases, with positive blood culture in 17.5%. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Streptococcus pneumonia (S. pneumonia) (19.3%) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (15.8%). Conclusion: Mortality rate in patients with severe CAP was high as reported by most of the other studies. The presence of septic shock and high APACHE II were independent predictors of mortality. Heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most common comorbidities. Microbiological identification was obtained in 52.6% of cases, and S. pneumonia and S. aureus were the most frequently isolated pathogens.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1330    
    Printed20    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded188    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal