SMOKING CESSATION
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 276-282

Evaluation of cupping therapy as an adjuvant therapy in a smoking cessation program


1 Department of Chest Diseases, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Department of Chest Diseases, Giza Chest Hospiatal, Giza, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Rehab M Mohammed
54 Abdel Rahman Elrafaey Street, El Hegaz Square, Heliopolis, Cairo 11786
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1687-8426.165935

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Background: Despite the methods available to aid smoking cessation, it still remains a major problem; thus, there is a need for a new alternative approach to control smoking. This study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of cupping therapy as an adjuvant therapy in a smoking cessation program. Participants and methods: This pilot randomized study included 46 male smokers attending the outpatient smoking cessation clinic. Patients were divided into two matched groups: the first group included 20 male smokers subjected to a smoking cessation program, whereas the second group included 26 male smokers subjected to the same smoking cessation program as group I in addition to a monthly bloodletting cupping session for 3 consecutive months as an adjuvant. All the smokers included attended three follow-up monthly visits for assessment of outcomes and frequency of withdrawal symptoms. Results: The success rate was the highest in the first follow-up compared with the second and the third follow-up in group II. There was no significant difference between both groups in the frequency of withdrawal symptoms during the first follow-up. During the second follow-up, there was a significant decrease in the frequency of occurrence of headaches and in the frequency of anxiety in the patients in group II compared with the patients in group I. During the third follow-up, there was a significant decrease in the frequency of occurrence of headache, weight gain, and tiredness in group II compared with group I. There was no significant difference between the outcomes of groups I and II; however, the success rate in group I was higher than that in group II. No significant differences were detected between the outcome in both groups in terms of age and smoking index. There was a significant difference in the effect of the number of cupping therapy sessions in the ability to quit smoking in group II. Conclusion: Bloodletting cupping therapy, which is not harmful if performed appropriately, is a simple procedure, economic, practical, and may be effective as an adjuvant in a smoking cessation program.


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